Bodybuilding Training Article from EricsGym.com

Weight Lifting and Weight Training - Chapter 22

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Individual Stations

Folding Bench Press

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Power Cage

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Jones Machine

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Squat Rack

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Roman Chair

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Vertical Knee Raise

Hack Squat Machine

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Dumbbell Rack

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Utility Bench

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Plate Loaded Gym

150 lb. Weight Stack

Selectorized Home Gym

Preacher Curl Attachment

Bench Squat Combo

Lat Machines

Phys-X Free-Standing Lat Tower

Olympic Weight Tree

Standard Weight Tree

Ab Crunch Machine

 

Home Gyms

Home Gyms

Performance Trainer

Biangular Gym

Two Stack Gym

4-in-1 Free Weight Gym

All-in-1 Free Weight Gym

Smith Gym

 

Cardio Equipment

Elliptical Trainer

 

Miscellaneous Items

Body Solid Miscellaneous

Bodybuilding Accessories

Gravity Inversion Boots

Ab Blaster Slings

Olympic Adapter Sleeves

Rubber Floor Protector

Olympic Shrug Bar

Push-Up Bars

WEIGHT LIFTING AS A COMPETITIVE SPORT

Chapter Twenty-Two

Schedules for the beginner

The character of a training schedule on the Olympic lifts is dependent on a combination of repetition of each movement, the number of sets, the poundage employed and frequency of training.

Low repetitions with heavy weights is the proved best route to maximum strength and efficiency -- but a beginner, in his first months of training, should use higher repetitions with correspondingly lighter weights.

This is because a beginner's muscular system isn't fully toned and accustomed to handling heavy poundages -- and I believe that a gradual building-up process should be followed right from the start, even although one may have undergone a period of bodybuilding with weights before starting on Olympic lifting.

The use of light weights -- gradually progressing to heavier ones -- is the best method of accustoming the muscles to the technical movements required, particularly on the Snatch and Clean and Jerk.

It is important to avoid the use of heavyweights while learning these movements. Later, the weight used can be stepped up and the number of repetitions reduced.

Generally, I recommend that this type of schedule be employed for a period of at least three months -- and longer in the case of individuals who are not naturally athletic, supple and speedy.

Here are some typical schedules that will serve the two-fold purpose of enabling the movements to be learned without having to force oneself too much to handle heavy weights, and at the same time giving sufficient resistance to gradually build up strength.

TWO HANDS PRESS

The weight used, of course, will vary according to one's strength and bodyweight, but I will have this on an assumed ability of 120 lb. for one strict movement. Adjustments can then be made according to ability.

85 lb.
5 repetitions 2 sets
95 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets
100 lb.
3 repetitions 3 sets
105 lb.
2 repetitions 3 sets
85 lb.
6 repetitions 1 set

Fixed-poundage Schedule
As an alternative, use the following:

95 lb.
4 repetitions 7 sets

Once a fortnight, work up to a maximum, poundage on the following lines:

85 lb.
3 repetitions 2 sets
95 lb.
3 repetitions 2 sets
100 lb.
3 repetitions 1 set
110 lb.
2 repetitions 1 set
115 lb.
1 single lift  
120 lb.
1 single lift  

Then try 125 lb. in order to achieve a new maximum poundage. All repetitions are to be made from the shoulders, performed in strict competition style.

TWO HANDS SNATCH

Repetitions and poundages are base on an assumed ability of 120 lb. for one strict movement.

85 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets
95 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets
100 lb.
3 repetitions 2 sets
105 lb.
2 repetitions 2 sets

Fixed-poundage Schedule
As an alternative, try the following:

100 lb.
4 repetitions 5 sets

Once a fortnight, work up to a maximum poundage on the following lines:

85 lb.
3 repetitions 2 sets
95 lb.
3 repetitions 2 sets
100 lb.
3 repetitions 1 set
110 lb.
2 repetitions 1 set
115 lb.
1 single lift  
120 lb.
   

Then try 125 lb. in order to be made form the commencing position each time. Make your first lift, then lower the barbell to the floor, reassume the commencing, position immediately, pause just a second or two, then repeat the lift.

TWO HANDS CLEAN AND JERK

Repetitions and poundages are based on an assumed ability of 150 lb. for one strict movement.

On this lift, it is advisable to regard the Clean and the Jerk as two separate lilts for the bulk of your training, although some time must be spent performing the complete movement.

110 lb.
3 cleans 2 sets
120 lb.
2 cleans 2 sets
130 lb.
2 cleans 2 sets
110 lb.
3 jerks 2 sets
120 lb.
2 jerks 2 sets
130 lb.
2 jerks 2 sets

Then do: 120 lb. 2 cleans and 1 jerk. 2 sets

When performing the Clean, make your repetitions in the same way as the Snatch, replacing the barbell on the floor before making the next repetition. On the Jerk, make your repetitions consecutive form the shoulders, as in the Press.

Fixed-poundage Schedule
As an alternative, use the following:

120 lb.
3 cleans 5 sets
  3 jerks 5 sets

Once a fortnight, work up to a maximum complete lift on the following lines:

110 lb.
2 cleans 2 sets
2 jerks 2 sets
120 lb.
2 cleans 1 set
2 jerks 1 set
130 lb.
1 complete lift  
140 lb.
1 complete lift  
145 lb.
1 complete lift  
150 lb.
1 complete lift  

The try 155 lb. in order to achieve a new maximum poundage.

When trying the extra 5 lb. on your limits, as specified above, add another 5 lb. if successful, until a new absolute maximum is reached. Then, add weight to all your poundages for the various repetitions and sets, to make your work progressive.

SUPPLEMENTARY EXERCISES

Even at this early stage it is advisable to include a few supplementary exercises in the schedule, and I suggest the following:

Squat (full movement)

110 lb.
6 repetitions 2 sets
120 lb.
5 repetitions 2 sets
130 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets

Use the following fixed poundage schedule as an alternative:

120 lb.
5 repetitions 6 sets

Power Clean

100 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets
110 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets
120 lb.
3 repetitions 2 sets
130 lb.
2 repetitions 2 sets

Use the following fixed-poundage schedule as an alternative

120 lb.
4 repetitions 6 sets

Bench Press

110 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets
120 lb.
4 repetitions 2 sets
130 lb.
3 repetitions 2 sets
140 lb.
2 repetitions 2 sets

Use the following fixed-poundage schedule as an alternative:

130 lb.
4 repetitions 6 sets

The poundages for the supplementary exercises may have to be adjusted accordingly to one's ability.

If one is able to train four times weekly, I suggest that on two days the Olympic lifts only should be practiced and on the other two days, two of the lifts plus the supplementary exercises.

Thus, your training program would read like this:

Monday: Olympic lifts only.

Wednesday: Press and Snatch, plus supplementary exercises.

Friday: Olympic lifts only.

Saturday or Sunday: Press and Jerk, plus supplementary exercises.

I advise this type of program, because generally, the practice of the Olympic lifts and all the supplementary exercises in one session will be way too much for beginners and will occupy too much time.

If you find that the three lifts and exercises can be managed comfortably and without any after effects of fatigue, then by all means do them, but usually it is not wise for a beginner to force himself during the first few months of training. After this period, you will be able to make a self-assessment of capacity for work, the muscular system will be getting used to the effects of the training and the amount of work undertaken can be increased or not accordingly.

Many will not find it possible to devote four sessions to training, and if this is the case, the above program will need adjustment according to individual circumstance and physical capacity.

More chapters from this book below...
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