Bodybuilding Training Article from EricsGym.com

Weight Lifting and Weight Training - Chapter 12

Home Gym Equipment

Individual Stations

Folding Bench Press

Adjustable Combo Bench

Flat Bench

Heavy Flat Bench

Adjustable Spotter Bench

Bench Press Spotter

Basic Bench Press

Self Spotter Rack

Power Cage

Hip Sled

Dumbbell Bench

Smith Machine Bench

Jones Machine

Back & Arm Machine

Cable Crossover Machine

Squat Rack

Preacher Curl Bench

Roman Chair

Hyperextension Bench

Seated Calf Machine

Vertical Knee Raise

Hack Squat Machine

Power Rack

Power Rack Bench Combo

Power Rack Lat Attachment

Leg Extension Curl

Ab Crunch Board

Dumbbell Rack

Flat Incline Decline Bench

Utility Bench

Smith Machine

Smith Lat Attachment

Plate Loaded Gym

150 lb. Weight Stack

Selectorized Home Gym

Preacher Curl Attachment

Bench Squat Combo

Lat Machines

Phys-X Free-Standing Lat Tower

Olympic Weight Tree

Standard Weight Tree

Ab Crunch Machine

 

Home Gyms

Home Gyms

Performance Trainer

Biangular Gym

Two Stack Gym

4-in-1 Free Weight Gym

All-in-1 Free Weight Gym

Smith Gym

 

Cardio Equipment

8k Treadmill

10k Treadmill

Elliptical Trainer

 

Miscellaneous Items

Body Solid Miscellaneous

Bodybuilding Accessories

Gravity Inversion Boots

Ab Blaster Slings

Olympic Adapter Sleeves

Rubber Floor Protector

Olympic Shrug Bar

Push-Up Bars

PART III

WEIGHT LIFTING AS A COMPETITIVE SPORT

Chapter Twelve

Modern Olympic Weightlifting

Modern competitive weightlifting is one sport of the strength athlete but to be a top-line or champion weight lifter one needs to be not only strong but also courageous, athletic, fast and mobile in joint and limb.

Many doctors and other professional men practice weightlifting both as a sport and a means of keeping fit and one of the Russian world and Olympic champions, Doctor Arkady Vorobyev, is an eminent surgeon. Another, Yuri Vlasov, the world's strongest Olympic lifter, is a man of outstanding intelligence and his favorite diversion is the study of philosophy. He writes expert commentaries on aviation-engineering as well as fiction and poetry.

The Japanese seven-man team for the 1960j Olympic Games was composed almost entirely of university students and graduates and in this country almost every university has a weightlifting group and annual university championships are held.

It will be seen that there is much more to weightlifting than just being brawny enough to heave up a heavy weight with muscles bulging and eyes popping -- which is the usual conception of the man in the street.

The sport has been a firmly established part of the Olympic Games since the modern revival of the four-yearly event in 1896. Going back to the year, we find that the weight lifting event was divided into two separate contests -- a one-handed lift and a two-handed lift, both overhead movements in the Clean and Jerk style (incidentally, the two hands' contest was won by an Englishman, Launceston Elliot). It is interesting to note, too, that there were no bodyweight classes in those days -- all entered irrespective of size or weight and modern Olympic lifting as we know it did not really begin until 1920. In that year the Games were held at Antwerp and the lifts were the One Hand Snatch, One Hand Clean and Jerk and the Two Hands Clean and Jerk.

In Paris, in 1924, the Two Hands Clean and Press and the Two Hands Snatch were added, to make a five-lift championship.

These lifts were replaced later by the "Olympic Three" -- the Two Hands Clean and Press, the Two Hands Snatch, and the Two Hands Clean and Jerk -- which have remained the standard lifts to the present day.

Now, with more than seventy nations affiliated to the International Federation, weight lifting is practiced on a vast world-wide scale.

There are, of course, many more movements than the 'Olympic Three' in use. In Britain, for example, the governing body recognizes no less than thirty-one different movements, although the present day tendency is to concentrate on only a fraction of this number.

The three Olympic lifts were selected as being the best representative set, bearing in mind the need for a streamlined program to satisfy the Games' organizers, and the popularity of these three lifts.

As a double-handed set, used for an Olympic sport, I believe they are the best, remembering that two of the movements -- the Snatch and the Clean and Jerk -- can be termed athletic in the true sense of the word -- fast, coordinated movements that should be part and parcel of an Olympic performer.

The main features of present-day activity are the Olympic Games and the annual world's championships which are staged in between the Olympic events, but we have other major championships such as the Pan-American Games, Asian Games, European championships, etc. and the national championships of all countries practicing the the sport.

World competition is governed by the International Weight Lifting Federation, which currently has its headquarters in England. This body was formed in 1920 and is responsible for the arrangements for world championships, the Olympic Games weight-lifting and other major continental and international events. Its other main function is to develop and control weight lifting on an international scale. It has to coordinate and supervise the activities of the national federations that are directly affiliated to it, and to set up such regulations as may be found desirable and practicable from time to time. It is responsible for the registering of world record and for ensuring that the complete and proper regulations are carried out.

Managing the Federation is a committee made up of a president, six vice-presidents, a general secretary-treasurer, and assistant secretary and four members.

A Congress is held every four years during the Olympic Games, in the town where the competitions takes place, and is attended by the delegates of the various affiliated nations. The congress considers proposals put forward by the nations, which are debated and then voted on in the normal constitutional manner.

From applications received, the Congress allocates the world championships which are held every year except Olympic Games year. It also allocates. European championships, when these are staged as separate event if the world champions, when these are staged as separate event if the world championships are held in a non-European country.

These world championships are indeed the high spot of each year's international activity and in most countries where they are held attract large and enthusiastic audiences. The post-war rivalry between the two outstanding nations, Russia and U.S.A. has largely contributed to this wide-spread interest and has been responsible to a great extent for the incredibly high standard of modern Olympic weight lifting.

Now, during the past few years, nations like Poland and Hungary are seriously challenging U.S.A. for second place to the Russians.

It is interesting to note the great differences of approach to the sport between the leading nations.

In the U.S.A., for many years the greatest weight-lifting nation, the A.D. (American Athletic Union) controls all amateur activities, with each of the various sports having its own governing committee.

With weightlifting, only minor sport, the grants allowed by the A.A.U. for participants in such events as world championships and international contests are small, and were it not for a man like wealthy Bob Hoffman, a super-enthusiast who regularly finances the trips of the U.S.A. national teams to all parts of the world, the standard of their champions would never have been so high.

Bob, together with the recent help of another grand worker and financial supporter, Clarence Johnson, who is the A.A.U. chairman for weightlifting and the President of the International Weight Lifting Federation, has played a major part in providing the American champions with the competition from other leading nations that has provided many stirring battles on the world championships platform.

Because of the opportunities afforded her champions and other leading performer, the U.S.A. has produced such men as Stan Stanczyk, the first to win three consecutive world titles at different bodyweights, and Tommy Kono, who won eight consecutive world and Olympic titles between 1952 and 1959.

In contrast, the current leading nation, the U.S.S.R., has many advantages over the U.S.A. In Russia, weightlifting is a major sport, with between 150,000 and 200,000 active participants (compared with perhaps 5,000 in the U.S.A.) and the State provides all the financial aid, training and other facilities that are necessary to keep them on top of the weightlifting world.

The other iron-curtain countries follow the same pattern and it is the customary procedure to send the national team to a training camp for several weeks prior to a world championships -- something that never happens in countries outside the Soviet bloc.

More chapters from this book below...
| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 |


Dumbbell Sets with Rack
on Sale with FREE Shipping

Free Weights

300 Lbs. Olympic Barbell Set

Troy Olympic Weight Plates

EZ-Grip VTX Olympic Barbell Set

VTX Olympic Weight Plates

160 Lbs. Regular Barbell Set

Regular Weight Plates

Regular 1-inch 7 Foot Bar

Texas Power Bar

Trap Bar

5 Foot Olympic Bar

210 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

300 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

390 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

400 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

480 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

500 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

570 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

600 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

700 Lb. Olympic Weight Set

7 Foot Olympic Chrome Bar

EZ-Curl Olympic Bar

Olympic Barbell Weight Sets

Olympic Weight Plates

Regular Barbell 160 Lbs.

Regular Weight Plates

Dumbbell Sets with Rack

Olympic Style Dumbbell Handle

Star Lock Threaded Dumbbell Handle

Spring Lock Collars

Shrug / Deadlift Olympic Bar

 

Pro-Grip Cable Attachments

Body Solid Pro-Grip Cable Attachments

Pro-Grip Multi-Exercise Bar

Pro-Grip Balanced V-Bar

Pro-Grip Triceps Press down Bar

Pro-Grip Revolving Straight Bar

Pro-Grip Multi-Grip Lat Bar

Pro-Grip Pro-Style Lat Bar

Pro-Grip Revolving Curl Bar

Pro-Grip Stirrup Cable Handle Pro-Grip

Pro-Grip Seated Row Chinning Bar Combo

 

Standard Cable Attachments

Body Solid Cable Attachments

Heavy Duty Lat Bar

Pro-Style Lat Bar 28" Long

Pro-Style Lat Bar 38" Long

Padded Black Lat Bar

X-Long Lat Bar

3-Way Lat Blaster Bar

Triceps Press down Bar

Revolving Triceps Biceps Bar

 

Leather & Nylon Items

Body Solid Leather & Nylon Accessories

Nylon Wrist Wraps

Pro Power Grips

Leather Ankle Strap

Nylon Ankle Strap